PTBi SOLARS Study
is seeking to stamp out preterm birth in Black and Latina/Hispanic women by looking at stress, coping and resilience. By participating you are joining the fight and taking action in providing valuable information to improve birth outcomes in our communities.
Pregnancy
Babies who come too soon or preterm birth is the most common reason that children under age 5 die worldwide. In the United States, the epidemic is highest in Black women and preterm birth is on the rise in Hispanic/Latina(x) women. The data from this study that includes participant survey answers and biospecimens may help us unlock new pathways, discoveries, and findings that could and should lead to effective interventions to decrease risk for preterm birth.
Stress
This study aims to address important knowledge gaps in our understanding of how psychological stress, individual and social risk and protective factors, resilience, and molecular factors are related to each other and to gestational age and preterm birth among Black and Latina women in Oakland.

About the study

SOLARS is one of the first, large-scale studies, designed by women of color, to help us understand the impact of stress, anxiety, and racism - in addition to resilience and coping - on preterm birth. The study aims give us a better understanding of the causes of preterm birth among women of color. The data we collect that includes participants' survey answers and biospecimens may help us unlock new pathways, discoveries, and findings that could and should lead to effective interventions to decrease risk for preterm birth in communities of color.

What is preterm birth? Why is this important to me, my baby and my community?

Preterm birth is when a baby is born too early before 37 weeks of pregnancy have been completed. In 2015, preterm birth affected about 1 of every 10 infants born in the United States (CDC, 2017). Being born preterm can lead to many health complications, a challenging beginning to life and additional adversities later on in life. Women of color are experiencing the highest rates of preterm birth in the United States and we want to understand why.

How does SOLARS work?

SOLARS asks that you allow us to be part of your pregnancy journey by asking you questions about your past and present life circumstances. You will fill out surveys at various time points online with the help of someone on the SOLARS research team, a person that you trust or entirely on your own. You will also be asked to provide small samples of saliva, blood, and urine at various time points.

 

For more details about the study and how you can participate, please visit the "For Participants" page.